A Radio Show … For Real

Pretending to host a radio show is my favorite Play Therapy technique. And now I have the chance to do it for real.

reel to reelIt started in 1970 with my father’s reel-to-reel tape recorder.  The thrill of that device was intoxicating and addictive … surpassing by far the allure of any toy. From the living room floor, I’d “broadcast” countless hours of shows. Commenting upon momentary whims, meditating on the arrival of my grandparents, singing self-authored songs, interviewing  family members. Beseeching my grandfather to record a bedtime story, preserved for posterity.

And along the way I grew up,  preserving detailed recollections of my development ~ emotional, social, physical and cognitive. Those recollections keep me close to the child mind, fostering insights that assist me today as a Clinical Child Psychologist and Play Therapist.

A Play Therapist must be a flexible, creative creature with a diverse collection of tools. The top of one’s head is often a rich source of inspiration. And one day, from that very location, an idea struck me ~ an impulse rooted in my own childhood play.

A reticent sensitive young boy on the Autistic spectrum was having a hard time settling into in therapy. Until I handed him a microphone.

microphoneIt was not a real microphone – but it was real enough to him. He took the wooden ruler in his hand and began to disclose the observations of his mind and yearnings of his heart to an imaginary audience. “Callers” ~ kids and adults, in as many accents as I could devise ~ requested his sage advice. The “Dr. Beth Show” became our therapy modality as I witnessed his coping efforts advance with grace and confidence. “The Show” became a dependable play therapy tool which has helped many child clients since.

So, when the VoiceAmerica.com Talk Tadio Network contacted me, I was incapacitated by laughter. Soon thereafter, incredulity morphed into musings ~ and musings into a clear vision. I began to imagine a child psychology program that could inform and support parents of young children wherever they are.  With delight, I accepted invitation to host a weekly radio show.

voiceamerica

Child Psych Central: Discover the KidBrain will launch December 11th at 10AM PST on VoiceAmerica.com. 

The show will feature my discussions with child mental health experts, local, national and international. We’ll cover issues that cross my desk weekly in my clinical practice.  My guests and I will explore early childhood conditions, issues and services to inform parents in an in-depth, accessible way.  I will ask my expert guests questions I believe parents would ask if they were in studio with me.

Find it on the Health & Wellness channel. Podcasts will be available on  iTunes and social media outlets. My Facebook and Twitter feed will feature guests and links to every episode. This blog will also feature guests and show topics to help you find resources for your family.

Please join me for the launch of Child Psych Central: Discover the KidBrain! Catch it on December 11th at 10AM Pacific on VoiceAmerica.com. Pretending was great fun – but I know this will be even more.  Hearty thanks to my colleagues, friends and client families for their advance support. Tune in – this time, for real!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What Every Parent Wants

 

Parents want lots of things for their kids.

But when they call me, there is astounding similarity in what they want. Parents arrive, hope in hand. They sit on my couch and describe children of different ages, issues, gender, and problem settings. Yet every parent wants the same thing. Improbable, but true.  How can this be?

 

paris girls chalk

 

CONNECT

Parents yearn for their young children to connect better —  with them at home, and with others outside the home.  They pray for smoother interactions between their child and other kids, between their child and other adults.  They wish their child could …

Get through a play date without a knock down/drag out, friend-goes-home-early;

Feel brave enough to say hello on the playground;

Handle teacher correction without feeling she’s “mean;”

Be able to tell a teacher what one feels and needs;

Have as many loving moments at home as challenging ones;

Enjoy mutually satisfying parent-child interactions.

COPE

What else do they want? Without exception, every parent who comes to my office wants “coping skills for my child.” After many years, I noticed this word mentioned in EVERY intake — not just many or most. Parents yearn for their child to acquire skills that can be remembered, applied and activated in troubling times. For their children to learn to handle a situation without aggression, withdrawal, meltdown, a freak out, or “bad choices.”

THRIVE

My new patient paperwork concludes with this question:

“Say you run into someone six months from now, someone who knows your family well but hasn’t seen you in a while. Somehow, things have gotten better. What would you like to be able to say?”

In the hopeful answers to this question, the same word keeps cropping up: THRIVE. “He is just thriving” or “She’s thriving now in every way …” Parents want their child to feel success, joy, light, achievement and resilient self-esteem – to thrive on every level of development.

So, parents want their children to connect and cope better, so ultimately they can thrive.  Over my 20 years as a child psychologist, I see those aspirations as intertwined. But perhaps not as you’d expect.

 

With preschool & primary graders,

child coping is a joint venture between adult & child.

They learn and practice these skills with YOU

and apply them in the world.

 

Wait … don’t kids learn to cope in the therapy room?

They learn it in every room. Young children are developing their “coping systems” – a complex blend of neurological, physiological and emotional and social mechanisms for reacting and responding to challenge. Part temperament and genetics, part modeling, part impulse control, part emotional regulation. A tall order for the young ones I see.   Very hard to do alone.  We adults actually help or hinder children’s coping through our interactions with them.

Adult-child interactions literally build kids’ brains, fortifying the neural groundwork for either calm, confident problem solving or alarmist, defensive/offensive or escapist problem solving.  What’s the difference? Asking for help versus throwing a chair; greeting an unfamiliar child versus hiding behind your leg; expressing the thought “This is too hard” versus running out of the classroom.

 

To help children connect, cope & thrive,

I teach adults to facilitate their child’s coping

through brain-building interactions styles.

 

At some point in the process of child therapy  most parents mention to me, “It kind of seems like you’re training us …”   Down the road, many parents also share a common disclosure, admitting somewhat sheepishly but with deep pride: “I noticed he really started to change when I started to change. I had no idea ….”

Child therapy is composed of direct child intervention AND parent guidance.   Parent workshops go straight to parent guidance.   Workshops pump parents full of information that lower the temperature of child problems.

For instance, parents learn why yelling never works.  We think the louder we yell, the more kids will remember the lesson next time. Right? Wrong. Yelling activates the threat center in the limbic system in the brain, taking blood and oxygen away from the thinking cortex. Yelling literally incapacitates the child’s cortex from problem solving. Thinking goes off line. Good coping doesn’t get rolling like that.

You can learn to help your child Connect, Cope & Thrive via child therapy or a parent workshop.  Or, you try to apply these few concepts and see if things improve:

Child coping starts at home in every interaction you share.

Your own calm coping is the best model for your child’s coping.

If your child’s “upset elevator” goes up, keep yours down.

 

Promote your child’s coping through calm connection that models the cool you want them to achieve. Remember, you are building his or her brain in these early years.  Parents are the most important part of child therapy.

 

Dr. Beth’s Parent Workshops & Saturday Seminars resume September 2014 including:  Savvy Solutions for Your Challenging Young Child; You & Your Anxious Child; and The Child-Sight Model: Change Your View and What You Think, Say and Do. Visit DrBethKids.com for details. 
 
Photo credit: by Beth Onufrak